Wednesday, July 3, 2019

The Romance of LibrariesThe Romance of Libraries by Madeleine Lefebvre
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

An optimistic and reassuring book that love and romance avail themselves to all with open minds and hearts. I feel blessed to have read this collection. The entries proved short and sweet without preachiness. I intend to buy this in the near future. It astounds me how the best literature often lives unpraised.


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Tuesday, July 2, 2019

The Scorpion's Sweet VenomThe Scorpion's Sweet Venom by Bruna Surfistinha
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I learned of Bruna Surfistinha from an Essence article to which she contributed comments. Some people would consider this book smut but a juicy read doesn't disappoint me. I plan to get another copy if I allow my friend to have it. I love abundant sex lives! This book won't depress you if you're the same way.


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Saturday, June 29, 2019

This Day: Diaries From American WomenThis Day: Diaries From American Women by Joni B. Cole
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I bought this from thriftbooks.com a few weeks ago. On top of that, I checked out more than ten books from the public library. The intrigue from the library books usurped much of my interest in this one. It's not dissatisfying. Aisha Tyler's contribution pleased me. I am glad she is not smitten by celebrity but still enjoys her profession. Many of the women had similar days: kids, coffee, groceries, dinner, ennui.

No rest for women!


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Monday, June 17, 2019

Do I Dare Disturb the Universe?: From the Projects to Prep SchoolDo I Dare Disturb the Universe?: From the Projects to Prep School by Charlise Lyles
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The ending disappointed me. I wanted to learn how Charlise adapted to prep school. I am a black woman who attended a white high school and I'd hoped to more deeply identify with her journey. I was saddened to see that her father influenced her to be an agnostic. How could one man have so much power for doing so little? I plan to give this book to my friend who embraces ethnic cultures.


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Saturday, May 25, 2019

Reading is my window : books and the art of reading in women's prisonsReading is my window : books and the art of reading in women's prisons by Megan Sweeney
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book builds much on her previous work, The Story Within Us . (Several of the women interviewed in that work were featured in this one.)The women, considering their circumstances, articulated their opinions soundly. The discussion and interview process edified Sweeney and the prisoners:"... I was buoyed by the realization that it meant a great deal, to some women, to be greeted by a friendly face who cared about them and considered their thoughts and stories important enough to record (Sweeney 249)." I think many individuals ought to read this book to gain knowledge and empathy for those incarcerated. 


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Kid Gloves: Nine Months of Careful ChaosKid Gloves: Nine Months of Careful Chaos by Lucy Knisley
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What would've been a dull Saturday morphed into an elated day reading this delight. I laughed at Lucy's candor about her discomfort during the pregnancy. (Those drawings with greenface and the facial expressions from her and John after witnessing their colicky niece--something to think about, folks!) I have mixed feelings about motherhood. I am at zero risk for it to happen in this stage of my life but I don't relish repeated agony as many women endure. But that's the key word--endure. Plus, Lucy chose a wonderful, supportive man for a husband and that provides much hope. I think Lucy and John would still have a loving union even if they had remained child-free. But it's heartening to know the love deepened once their son entered the world.

That's something to aspire to.


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Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Book Girl: A Journey Through the Treasures and Transforming Power of a Reading LifeBook Girl: A Journey Through the Treasures and Transforming Power of a Reading Life by Sarah    Clarkson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book centers on Christian spirituality. It warms me to see sound, healthy subjects discussed and presented. I am a woman who needs light and love to feel healthy and full. This book illuminates.


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Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The Story Within Us: Women Prisoners Reflect on ReadingThe Story Within Us: Women Prisoners Reflect on Reading by Megan Sweeney
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I did not anticipate loving this book so much. Obviously, it's sad because they're locked up but the women express themselves with such candor. These women would be jewels in society. So much wisdom and intelligence. They're also plentiful in resources and patience. I am grateful that no one laid blame on others for the actions but they did pinpoint that people triggered certain responses.

A must read for feminists or anyone with empathy.



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Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Frida  Diego: Art, Love, LifeFrida  Diego: Art, Love, Life by Catherine Reef
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This would be a sweet introduction to the lives and art of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo for young people. It displays their frailties and strengths without judgment. I am an admirer of Frida so there was nothing here I had not known before.

Cheers!



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Saturday, April 20, 2019

I'd Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading LifeI'd Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading Life by Anne Bogel
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Anne Bogel has written a charming book with substance. In one chapter, she describes how reading choices informs the woman she is. In her childhood, the decision of what to read was elected for her and then in adulthood, she moved to governing her reading habits. This differs from my experience. Only when I was a toddler did my elders choose books for me. Once I learned to read, I was free to read what intrigued me, provided it wasn't gruesome or explicit. She admits she rereads books. Once I turned 30, I ceased this habit. So many books, so little time. I record my opinions of a book along with the dates read. But I've lost the interest to reread books. 

This book fits springtime.


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Friday, March 29, 2019

Cécile: Gates of Gold (Girls of Many Lands)Cécile: Gates of Gold by Mary Casanova
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I've been occupied with school so this book took longer than it should have. An engaging reimagining of Louis XV's early childhood. I was relieved at the ending. It gave Cecile the opportunity to grow beyond the confines of court life for which she was not suited.


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Sunday, March 3, 2019

Dear America by Jose Antonio Vargas

Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented CitizenDear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen by Jose Antonio Vargas
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My teacher arranged for us to read this book. It stretched my empathy. I feel that the first half of the book has greater clarity. Once he gets in the Obama presidency, his rationale gets murkier. I am aware that he got his first driver's license from Oregon. I was always told when there's a will, there's a way. Absolutely no recourse to getting citizenship? I don't understand how undocumented people pay taxes but don't have citizenship. That makes no sense to me. I think if you pay taxes and are obeying the law, you ought to be granted citizenship. I wouldn't desire to exist in the purgatory that Jose Antonio Vargas dwells or anyone else. He's being cheated of a enriched life.


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Thursday, February 28, 2019

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures edited by America Ferrera

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between CulturesAmerican Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures by America Ferrera
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I didn't anticipate enjoying this tome so much. I bought it for school as a required text. Usually, required texts make me frown and resent the money spent. This book can be treasured in any circumstance. Many of these people aren't A-listers but notable nonetheless. I enjoyed Uzo Aduba's essay the most. I relished her insights into Nigerian culture and how it contrasts with her perception of New England. I am half Nigerian and all I know about Nigeria comes from book knowledge. I also appreciated Anjelah Johnson-Reyes' piece about wanting to be more chola. Why do privileged people feel they need to be more rugged? Thankfully, every contributor has reached a place of satisfaction with his or her self.

A blessing to read!



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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Diary of a Sex Fiend: Girl with a One Track Mind by Abby Lee

Diary of a Sex Fiend: Girl with a One Track MindDiary of a Sex Fiend: Girl with a One Track Mind by Abby Lee
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I admire Abby's candor. It seems exciting to have a range of partners with whom you have electrifying sex. (I need to reverse my lifestyle.) During my experience reading this book, I decided to research the author. The British media blasted her anonymity and she decided to move to New York City to escape the furor. I don't know for certain if she still lives in the Big Apple. At the end of the book, she expresses the desire to have sex doggie-style with her husband "when our kids are asleep (Lee 310)."

I hope she's found delight.



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Saturday, February 16, 2019

Women Who Love Books Too Much: Bibliophiles, Bluestockings, & Prolific Pens from the Algonquin Hotel to the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Brenda Knight

Women Who Love Books Too Much: Bibliophiles, Bluestockings & Prolific Pens from the Algonquin Hotel to the YA-YA SisterhoodWomen Who Love Books Too Much: Bibliophiles, Bluestockings & Prolific Pens from the Algonquin Hotel to the YA-YA Sisterhood by Brenda Knight
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I didn't anticipate that this book would be a collection of biographical sketches. Nonetheless, I count it as joyous blessing. I learned more of women from antiquity and the recent centuries. I hadn't learned of Enheduanna, Aphra Behn, Kathleen Raine, Grazia Deledda, Lucy Terry Prince,Barbara Tuchman, Jane Welsh Carlyle, and Meret Oppenheim. I had seen the name Enheduanna in a textbook on Mesopotamia during a history course.

This book presents legendary women in an accessible fashion. Many times, legends have their humanity snatched from them on the printed page. A reader empathizes with these women.



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